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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the surprise announcement, and we assess benedict's legacy and the challenges ahead for the catholic church. >> woodruff: then we get an update on the search for the fugitive police officer wanted for murder from los angeles mayor antonio villaraigosa. >> suarez: elizabeth brackett of wttw-chicago has the story of a dramatic drop in the water level of lake michigan, endangering the economies of towns along the shore. >> if i had been walking along this beach in 1984, the water would have been almost a foot over my head. >> woodruff: on the daily download, christina bellantoni examines what it means to "like" someone-- or something-- on facebook. >> suarez: and jeffrey brown talks with novelist brad meltzer about his new book, writing thrillers, and his research into presidential assassins. >> if you look at all the people, they have almost nothing in common. it's every age range and socioeconomic range. look at the four who have successfully done it and the overlap starts getting a little creepier. >> woodruff
, including waterboarding and drone strikes. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we excerpt today's testimony, which was interrupted from the start by protesters from the anti-war group, code pink. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the massive manhunt for a former los angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo
% of the american diet, less than before but not by much. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we sort through what all this means for america's obesity problem in children and adults. >> woodruff: then, we look at health care for the pooras florida's republican governor is the latest to embrace the obama administration's program to expand medicaid. >> suarez: margaret warner gets an update on the syrian civil war, as attacks on damascus escalate and the deadliest car bomb to date rocks the capital. >> woodruff: our week long focus on guns, "after newtown" continues with two reports: first, the state of play in florida, which has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a smal petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scot
station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the world witnessed something today it had not seen since the 15th century: a sitting pope, benedict xvi, announced he is giving up the papacy. the news reverberated around the globe and stunned many of the world's 1.2 billion catholics. >> it was a big surprise because this doesn't happen all the time. and my first reaction was to pray and to call my friends, texted my friends and asked even my non-catholic and nonbelieving friends to keep us in their thoughts and in their prayers. >> i had never heard anything like this in my life. the pope has to be there until he dies. and he is resigning? >> popes can't resign. this hasn't happened in 600 years. a pope can't resign. this news isn't right. >> suarez: a pope abdicated in 1294 but the last pontiff to do so was gregory 12th in 1415. pope benedict's decision at age 85 came in an announcement made in latin during a meeting of cardinals at the vatican. >> dear brothers, i have called you not only for the three can onizations but also to communicate to you a decision of great importance f
confirmation by the intelligence panel, and the full senate. >> suarez: online, find margaret warner's blog post about the impact brennan has had on the nation's counter-terrorism policy. and still to come on the "newshour": searching for an ex-police officer; tightening sanctions on iran; creating support systems for at-risk students; releasing documents about child abuse in los angeles and re-examining the life of rosa parks. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: for the first time, pentagon leaders said today they had supported arming the rebels in syria. defense secretary leon panetta and general martin dempsey chair of the joint chiefs said they made that recommendation to president obama. panetta told a senate hearing that, in the end, the president decided against sending in arms. instead, the u.s. has provided only humanitarian aid to the rebels. secretary panetta also defended the military's response to the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the assault killed ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. panetta testifie
in friday. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we get an update on the potential impact the sequester will have if the white house and congress can't work out a compromise. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner looks into the troubles looming for the catholic church ahead of electing a new pope. >> suarez: a cuba without a castro in charge? we talk with senator patrick leahy, who just returned from the island after an unsuccessful attempt to secure the release of an imprisoned american. >> woodruff: fred de sam lazaro reports on india's push to account for hundreds of millions of its citizens by issuing government identity cards. >> we still have a large number of residents much india who don't have a birth certificate or any other form of official i.d., but now with the highly mobile and aspirational society, you need some kind of an i.d. >> suarez: we talk with reporter steven brill about his time magazine cover story on why medical bills are so high. >> woodruff: and on the daily download, christina bellantoni examines white house effort
station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: there may be hope yet for bringing the national epidemic of obesity under control. at least, the latest numbers on calories and fast food, released today, indicated possible progress. for years, health officials have warned about americans' growing girth. now, research from the centers for disease control and prevention suggests the fight against fat may be having an effect. among the findings: american children consumed fewer calories in 2010 than a decade before-- 7% less for boys and 4% less for girls. and for adults, fast food accounted for just over 11% of the calories consumed in 2010, down from nearly 13% in 2006. the researchers acknowledge the changes are small and can't be fully explained. but public campaigns against obesity have intensified in recent years. last september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition that takes effect march 12th. >> this is the single biggest step any city i think has taken to curb ob
's air travel system. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, "washington post" reporter lisa rain walks us through the reality and the hype surrounding the timing and impact of sequestration, as the countdown for a deal enters its final wee >> woodruff: then, margaret warner looks at today's summit between president obama and japanese prime minister abe, where japan's tensions with china were very much in the forefront. >> suarez: our week long focus on guns, "after newtown" wraps up tonight with a report from chicago on the public health crisis in the city in the wake of rising gun violence. >> the people who come in after having been shot are some of the highest risk folks. these are people who have been shot, who may have been shot before, and really without some intervention, without some life- changing moment, the trajectory's either going to be jail or death. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and, as a magistrate grants oscar pistorius bail, we talk to charlayne hunter gault about how
station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama and congressional republicans traded barbs today, opening the final week before the looming sequester. but there was no outward sign of a breakthrough to prevent $85 billion in automatic spending reductions. >> these cuts do not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> suarez: the president's appeal came as he met with the nation's governors at the white house amid growing indications that the sequester will indeed take effect. >> this town has to get past its obsession with focusing on the next election instead of the next generation. all of us are elected officials. all of us are concerned about our politics both in our own parties as well as the other parties. but at some point we have to do some governing. and certainly what we can't do is keep careening from manufactured crisis to manufactured crisis. >> suarez: to reinforce the point, the administration on sunday spelled out how each state will be affected from job losses for teachers to cuts in defense spending.
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: with just a week left before automatic spending cuts are set to begin, the obama administration stepped up pressure on republicans in congress today. the latest warnings came over the potential impact that furloughs would have on air travel, starting in april. transportation secretary ray lahood said travelers could face new delays of 90 minutes at major airports in chicago, new york and san francisco. more than 100 air control towers at smaller airports could be closed, lahood said. airlines likely would cancel flights. and congress, he said, would hear of the fallout. >> it's not only the impact on the passengers, it's the impact that it has on airports, control towers, people who work there, airports. and their phones are going to start ringing. why does this have to happen? nobody likes a delay. nobody likes waiting in line. none of us do. if we can't get our hamburger within five minutes, if we can't get on the plane within 30, 40, 50 minutes after going through, you know what h
. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick about his oscar-nominated documentary "the invisible war," detailing the high rate of sexual assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you
? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signs of life past and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy
away from his country for months, had returned there in the middle of the night. ray suarez reports. >> suarez: venezuela's minister of information proclaimed the news on state television. president hugo chavez had returned. >> congratulationses to the venezuelan people for the strength and maturity you have had during all of these days of companionship and solidarity with chavez >> suarez: the fiery leftist leader seen in these photographs from friday had spent more than two months in cuba for cancer treatment. the photos showed chavez, his two daughters, and that day's newspaper as if to quash rumors that he had died. but today unlike previous returns from medical visits to cuba, there were no images of his early morning home coming. still supporters celebrated outside the military hospital where the 58-year-old chavez is continuing treatment. >> venezuela waits for you with open arms, my commandte. we love you. we want you. there's an entire population that will support you always >> suarez: and chavez in his first direct communication with the world since departing for cuba upda
about the conflict. ray suarez reports. >> suarez: it was a short moment in a long hearing devoted to another topic, and it yielded a surprising set of answers from defense secretary leon panetta, and the joint chiefs chairman, general martin dempsey. arizona republican john mccain asked about a report that president obama rejected a proposal to arm syrian rebels last summer. >> did you support the recommendation by secretary of state... then secretary of state clinton and then head of c.i.a. general petraeus that we provide weapons to the resistance in syria? did you support that? >> we did. >> you did support that. >> we did. >> suarez: so far, the president's judgment has been that things won't get better with american arms. instead, he's warned the weapons might fall into the hands of extremist elements, a concern reiterated today by the new secretary of state, who was asked about the deliberations last year. >> i don't know what the discussions were in the white house and i'm not going backwards. the new administration, we're going forward from this point. there are serious qu
in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> is program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosives outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey, today, killing himself and a security guard. the white house descr
secretary of defense. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with marcia coyle about today's supreme court arguments over getting a d.n.a. sample from a suspect who was arrested but not convicted of a crime. >> ifill: special correspondent kira kay previews next week's presidential contest in kenya, where memories linger from the violence that followed the 2007 elections. >> we talk about people dead. i think if you count it over time and those who don't know it's probably around 2,000. massive, huge kills. we were on the brink of civil war. >> woodruff: and we close with a conversation with gloria steinem about the women's movement and the pbs documentary, "makers: women who make america." >> we have realized that a majority of americans fully agree that women can do what men can do but we haven't yet realized that men can do what women do. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all peo
waterboarding and drone strikes. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we excerpt today's testimony, which was interrupted from the start by protesters from the anti-war group, code pink. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the massive manhunt for a former los angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)